Idaho Statewide Conference

June 25-26, 2024
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In-Person Event

Idaho Statewide Conference

TRAUMA-INFORMED, VICTIM-CENTERED TRAINING, BEST PRACTICES, AND TIMELY ADDRESSING EMERGING TRENDS

EXCITING NEWS

The Idaho Council on Domestic Violence & Victim Assistance (ICDVVA), the Idaho Governor’s Taskforce on Children At Risk (IDCARTF), and Building Hope Today are proud to partner on our first joint conference!  Previously, we each held an annual conference in June.  In 2024, we are pleased to join forces on one conference to maximize benefits for our shared audiences.

THEME

This year’s conference theme will be “Awareness to Action: Transforming Responsive Services in Idaho.”

Description

The conference brings together multidisciplinary team professionals working in the areas of domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, stalking, and human trafficking to share knowledge and data and facilitate collaborations that will strengthen systems and enhance services for victims of crime in Idaho.

Attendance is capped at 500 people – Sign up fast!

The conference focuses on tactical training and practice, as opposed to being academic in nature.

The conference planning committee is committed to including diverse participation and perspectives to provide insights and highlight innovative approaches to meet the needs of crime victims and the agencies and systems providing victim services.

Location & Dates

The Riverside Hotel (2900 W Chinden Blvd, Garden City, ID 83714).
Tuesday, June 25, and Wednesday, June 26, from 7:30 am to 4:30 pm (Mountain Time) each day.

COST
Registration

$125 per person for the 2-day conference.  The cost includes lunch and snacks each day.  Registration is capped at the first 500 people.  (Note: Early bird pricing ran April 1 – May 12.)

Refunds

Refunds, minus the payment processing fee, will be allowed up to 30 days before the event.  Registrations may be transferred after this time but cannot be refunded as we must commit to attendee numbers for Riverside catering (etc.).

Online Payment Processing Fee Vs. Checks

If paying online, there is a 2.2% + $0.30 per transaction payment processing fee (e.g., $125 = $128.12).
To avoid the fee, please use this alternative sign-up method (click here) to pay by check (remember, registration spots will only be secured when payment is received).

Schedule Day 1
Schedule Day 2
  • 7:30 – 8:00 am = Check-in
  • 8:00 – 8:30 am = Opening remarks
  • 8:30 – 10:00 am = Keynote speaker
  • 10:00 – 10:30 am = Break
  • 10:30 – 11:45 am = Breakout 1 (6 tracks)
  • 11:45 – 1:15 pm = Lunch
  • 1:15 – 2:30 pm = Breakout 2 (6 tracks)
  • 2:30 – 2:45 pm = Break
  • 2:45 – 4:00 pm = Breakout 3 (6 tracks)
  • 7:30 – 8:00 am = Check-in
  • 8:00 – 8:30 am = Day 2 remarks
  • 8:30 – 10:00 am = Keynote speaker
  • 10:00 – 10:30 am = Break
  • 10:30 – 11:45 am = Breakout 1 (6 tracks)
  • 11:45 – 1:15 pm = Lunch
  • 1:15 – 2:30 pm = Breakout 2 (6 tracks)
  • 2:30 – 2:45 pm = Break
  • 2:45 – 4:00 pm = Breakout 3 (6 tracks)
Opening Remarks
Day 1 - Alex J. Adams, PharmD, MPH

Director of the Idaho Department of Health & Welfare

Alex J. Adams, PharmD, MPH, was appointed to lead the Department by Governor Brad Little in May 2024.

The Department has a staff of nearly 3,000 and an annual budget of $5.5 billion. Dr. Adams is committed to improving the health and wellbeing of all Idahoans, with the following goals for the Department:

  • Strengthening child welfare.
  • Promoting upward mobility.
  • Improving behavioral health.
  • Reducing the regulatory burden on Department stakeholders.

Prior to leading the Department, Dr. Adams spent more than five years as Governor Little’s budget and regulatory director. In this capacity, he oversaw the state’s first upgrade to a AAA credit rating with both Fitch Ratings and Moody’s. He helped lead the development of major policy initiatives such as Idaho LAUNCH and the financing of $1.5 billion in school facility infrastructure improvements. He helped build the rainy-day funds to the largest fund balance in state history. He also led the Governor’s zero-based regulation initiative which led Idaho to becoming the least regulated state in the nation, eliminating more than 2,700 pages of regulations.

He earned his bachelor’s degree and Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Toledo in Ohio, graduating as class valedictorian, and his Master of Public Health degree from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. Dr. Adams lives in Eagle with his wife Jennifer and daughter Emerson.

Day 2 - Governor Brad Little

Governor of Idaho

The people of Idaho elected Brad Little to be their Governor in November of 2018 and reelected him in November of 2022. He has served as Idaho’s 33rd Governor since January 7, 2019.

Governor Little is an Emmett native who was raised on his family’s sheep and cattle ranching operation. He graduated from the University of Idaho in 1977 with a Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness, and has worked in the ranching industry for his entire professional life. In 1978, Brad had good fortune and married Teresa Soulen of Weiser.

Teresa and Brad are the proud parents of two sons who have wonderful wives – Adam and Angela, and David and Kelsey. They have six beautiful grandchildren.

Governor Little has a heart for public service. He first served in public office in 2001 when he was selected to fill a Senate vacancy. He was then elected to four consecutive terms to the Idaho Senate. During his service as a Senator, Brad was elected by his Republican peers during his first full term to serve in Party leadership as Majority Caucus Chair. He then served as Idaho’s 37th Lt. Governor starting on January 6, 2009.

Governor Little is committed to making decisions through one lens: the lens of ensuring Idaho’s children and grandchildren have the best opportunities to stay in Idaho and for the ones who have left to choose to return. His time as Governor has been marked by historic investments in education and infrastructure and unprecedented tax relief.

Governor Little has advocated his whole life for limited government, and Idaho achieved the title “least regulated state” during his first term. He works to ensure the lightest possible hand of government in the lives of Idaho’s citizens, and he seeks to build the public’s confidence in state government.

Keynote Speakers
Day 1 - Kevin Mulcahy, JD

Randy & Me: A Prosecutor’s Story About His Childhood Sexual Abuse

This Keynote will recount Kevin’s own story of sexual exploitation at the hands of his soccer coach, Randy. But, it will not be merely a retelling of the past. Instead, the presentation will address lessons learned from his case by combining Kevin’s experience both as a victim and a long-time prosecutor of child exploitation cases. Knowing what he knows now, Kevin believe there are lessons to be learned from his story for the investigator (Kevin’s was great), the prosecutor (Kevin’s was terrible), and the forensic interviewer (Kevin did not have one). Beyond these (hopefully) useful lessons, the presentation will provide plenty of time for questions from attendees. Given the nature of our work, we don’t often get to ask questions (beyond factual questions) of our child victims. This presentation will provide that opportunity.

_____________

Kevin Mulcahy is a survivor of child sexual abuse. He spent over 20 years as an Assistant U.S. Attorney. Throughout his career, Kevin prosecuted a variety of cases, including offenses involving firearms, drugs, bank robberies, threats, terrorism, and other federal prosecutions. But most of his caseload focused on child exploitation crimes, including production of child pornography cases, traveler cases, and other significant crimes against children prosecutions. Kevin also serves on the board of directors of his local Child Advocacy Center. Kevin obtained his undergraduate degree in Statistics and American Culture from the University of Michigan and his JD from Santa Clara School of Law, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the Santa Clara Law Review. He has 3 kids, 2 pets, and a very nice wife.

Day 2 - Donna Bartos, MPA

The prevention of Domestic/Sexual/Teen Dating Violence, Especially Among Gen Z Youth

In 2006, Donna Bartos founded BLOOM365 to “uproot abuse” in a generation. Inspired by personal lived experience and years of self-guided immersive research, Donna authored the “Are you blooming or wilting?” prevention education curriculum and created the L.E.V.E.L.™ response strategy, tools anyone can use to reduce the risk of interpersonal violence from spreading from one generation to the next. She has been recognized locally and nationally for her vision and ability to turn theory and research into practice. Most recently, in collaboration with the SARC team at Wyoming Army National Guard and Hill Air Force Base, Donna developed and piloted an integrated prevention program to reduce the risk factors associated with interpersonal violence perpetration among Gen Z military personnel.  She holds a BA in Communication from McDaniel College and an MPA from Grand Canyon University.

 
Quotes:
 
“If we continue to put the responsibility of ending victimization on the shoulders of those who experience it, we will never end domestic and sexual violence.
 
“Abusers are not born, they are built.
Conference tracks
June 25 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Neha Mehta, MD
Medical Director @ Audrey Hepburn CARE Center (New Orleans)

Child Sexual Abuse – When Victims Don’t “Act” Like Victims

Presentation Outline:

It is recommended that children who may have been sexually abused receive medical evaluation. The National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC) recommends that children receive these medical evaluations from specially trained medical providers. There are many myths associated with child sexual abuse including that children will disclose promptly and that a genital exam will provide confirmation/proof of sexual abuse. This training workshop will discuss these and other myths associated with child sexual abuse and explain the benefits of a medical evaluation as part of the multidisciplinary approach to child sexual abuse cases. Members of the MDT sometimes struggle with why children need medical evaluation if the exam doesn’t provide proof of sexual abuse. This presentation addresses the benefits of receiving specialized medical evaluation and highlights the important role that medical providers have in working with non-offending parents in addressing the common myths associated with child sexual abuse.

Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will learn at least 3 reasons that children delay disclosure of sexual abuse.

2. Participants will become familiar with the critical role the non-offending caregiver has in the overall well-being of the child victim as well as the outcome of the case.

3. Participants will understand reasons why pediatric genital exams are so often “normal” despite children making very clear and detailed disclosures of sexual abuse.

June 25 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Tom Tueller, LCSW
Founder & Counsellor @ Tueller Counseling Services

The 7 Stages of Grooming & Delayed Disclosure – the Keys to Child Sexual Abuse Identification, Investigation, Prosecution, and Prevention

Presentation Outline:

This presentation will focus on the 7 Stages of Grooming used by 93% of offenders to identify how perpetrators target and sexually abuse their victims. Grooming & Delayed Disclosure are the keys to child sexual abuse investigation and prosecution. Attendees will learn how to handle their most challenging cases – those with NO physical evidence, NO eyewitnesses, NO crime scene, NO offender cooperation, and NO confession. Attendees will gain access to the Grooming Investigative Fact Tracker sheet.

Recent training testimonials:

– A Prosecutor said: “I think this training is essential not only as professionals but as an everyday human being. Understanding the signs and dangers of grooming and delayed disclosures is so important to know as parents, siblings, aunts/uncles, grandmas/grandpas, etc. This training really explained it in a way that is easy to understand and very relatable.”

– A Prosecutor said: “This training provided a new way of looking at cases. I had detectives talk to me about cases we’re working on together, saying, ‘We can do this differently… We can add this… I can ask this question…’ We’re looking at future cases and cases we could have done better with this knowledge.”

– A Victim Advocate said, “This opened my awareness of acts of grooming. Throughout the course, a case kept coming to mind. I needed this information.”

– A Mental Health Therapist said: “Learning about the 7 stages of grooming and how children are psychologically affected by the abuse was critical. A lot of the case examples were really hard to listen to, and I had to walk away from them several times because it was too intense and emotional for me.  Despite that, it helped increase my understanding and empathy for the survivors.”

– A Victim Witness Coordinator said, “This training was full of great information and very eye-opening. Learning more about delayed exposure was the most crucial component for me and my job. It helped give me a more rounded understanding of why some people wait decades before ever disclosing anything.”

– A Forensic Interviewer said: “It was great having training that focused so strongly on grooming, both towards the child and the caregivers. Other trainings I’ve been to touch upon grooming do not go as indepth as this one. It’s such a vital piece to these investigations. Thanks!”

– A Prosecutor said: “How important understanding Grooming can be to a prosecutor’s case and that the interviewing process is equally as important to help your case as well as protecting victims from more trauma.”

Learning Objectives:

1. Attendees learn the 7 Stages of Grooming used by 93% of offenders to identify how perpetrators target and abuse their victims.

2. Attendees learn common misconceptions about child sexual abuse.

3. Attendees learn that because of the grooming behavior, delayed disclosure of sexual abuse is a very common by-product.

4. Attendees learn that victims often disclose different information about the abuse at different times and in multiple settings.

5. Attendees learn the role of grooming behaviors, pinpointing critical warning signs that often go unrecognized, leading to successful prosecutions and case outcomes for their clients.

6. Attendees who understand the grooming process can better support their clients/victims.

7. Attendees gain access to the Grooming Investigative Fact Tracker Sheet.

June 25 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Neha Mehta, MD
Medical Director @ Audrey Hepburn CARE Center (New Orleans)

Medical & Investigative Findings of Child Physical Abuse

Presentation Outline:

Medical evaluation is a necessary part of the multidisciplinary response to child physical abuse. Multiple case-based examples will be used to illustrate why it is important for medical providers and investigators to work together on child abuse cases. Topics include: sentinel injuries, patterned marks, scene investigation, serial photography and collateral sources of information.

Learning Objectives:

1. The participant will learn to identify at least 3 patterned skin injuries that are indicative of child physical abuse.

2. The participant will learn about investigative details that can assist the medical provider in determining if an injury is accidental or abusive in nature.

3. The participant and will become familiar with the principles utilized to distinguish accidental from abusive skin injuries.

June 26 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Kenneth Rogers Jr.
Survivor, Author, Speaker

Heroes, Villains, and Healing

Presentation Outline:

Superheroes have always been a source of strength for those who feel weak. “Heroes, Villains, and Healing” will be used to show how the DC heroes and villains we love and love to hate can be used to help heal the trauma of PTSD in survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Superheroes such as Flash, Superman, Batman, and villains such as Joker, Two-Face, and Mister Zsasz provide more than entertainment in comics we read and movies we watch. They provide a means to understanding coping mechanisms such as hypervigilance, workaholism, addiction, and even humor to progress throughout the healing progress to become more than a hero, villain, victim, or survivor, but the complete individuals they were meant to be. Superheroes provide a safe means to address complex issues that survivors can use to thrive as they progress along their journey of healing.

Learning Objectives:

1. Attendees will understand how to help survivors navigate the healing process using DC comic superheroes and villains.

2. Attendees will understand how and why survivors of childhood sexual abuse use hypervigilance as a coping mechanism using the DC Comics superhero Batman.

3. Attendees will understand how and why survivors of childhood sexual abuse use perfectionism as a coping mechanism using the DC Comics superhero Superman.

4. Attendees will understand how Green Lantern can be used to help survivors feel and understand their emotions using the two different forms of the Subjective Units of Distress Scales (SUDS).

June 26 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Kassandra McGrady, JD
Assistant U.S. Attorney @ U.S. Attorney’s Office

Internet Grooming and Offenders Who Commit Hands-On Offenses

Presentation Outline:

– The characteristics of online grooming of child victims.

– The different types of online child exploitation (enticement, sextortion, and child sexual abuse images/material)

– Internet offenders who commit hands-on sexual offenses

– Case examples demonstrating the different types of online sexual exploitation

– Investigative tips for cases involving online exploitation.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand grooming in the internet context.

2. Understand the different types of online exploitation.

3. Understand the interplay between offenders who commit online exploitation and those who commit hands-on sexual offenses.

4. Gain tools to help investigate online sexual exploitation.

June 26 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Katie Francis
Director @ Idaho Resilience Project

Children of Trauma & Resilience

Presentation Outline:

This presentation introduces participants to a trauma-informed and resilience-focused mindset and teaches participants about toxic stress and trauma, how to help process those experiences and how to foster and nurture characteristics of resilience. It begins with a strong focus on resilience and includes an exploration of how core values and beliefs direct the way professionals work with children. Understanding the fundamentals of development and the impact of trauma is crucial in not only understanding children, but also the behavior of adults that have experienced trauma.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the basic science of development, trauma’s impact on the brain and how this can present in children of different ages.

2. Understand the four main protective factors of resilient children and how to foster those relationships/needs.

3. Implications for daily practice- this is a major focus for the content. There are specific skills and techniques taught to help professionals and caregivers to interact with children that have experienced trauma in a new frame of thought.

June 25 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Ellen Williams
Director – Justice for Incarcerated Survivors Program @ Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence

Reinventing Justice – Advocating for Criminalized Survivors

Presentation Outline:

Survivors of domestic and sexual violence are too often criminalized as a result of the abuse that they experience. They face substantial challenges within the legal system that lead to frequent arrest and conviction, harsh sentences, and significant barriers to obtaining their release post-conviction. This workshop will first briefly offer information about how to structure an effective program that can serve criminalized survivors with a focus on collaborative and multidisciplinary approaches. Next, the workshop will explore how and why survivors are criminalized, offering information about the evolution of this problem, including relevant history of the anti-violence and mass incarceration movements, statistics about this problem nationally and in Idaho, and information about intersectionality with other pertinent issues such as racial bias and gender bias. Further, this section will present information about what charges are frequently brought against survivors and what scenarios lead to survivors being criminalized. A case study exercise will be used in this portion of the presentation, with breakout discussion and reporting back to the larger group. The workshop will then present information on barriers in the legal system faced by criminalized survivors with brief notes on proposed solutions. Lastly, the workshop will present information about the particular challenges criminalized survivors face in the legal system, and provide concrete tools that advocates, lawyers, and other professionals can use in the scope of their work to help end the criminalization of survival.

Learning Objectives:

1. Provide a comprehensive understanding of how the criminalization of survivors came to be in the context of the anti-violence/mass incarceration movements with an eye toward intersectionality with gender and race-based issues.

2. Provide a thorough overview of how/why survivors are criminalized – what scenarios lead to this phenomenon and what aspects of “the system” perpetuate this issue.

3. Provide attendees in various professional roles concrete tools that can be used in the context of their day-to-day work to prevent the criminalization of survivors, help already criminalized survivors navigate the legal system, and advocate for the release of incarcerated survivors.

The goal of this workshop is to provide comprehensive knowledge on how/why survivors are criminalized. Understanding the evolution of the mass incarceration and anti-violence movements is critical to understanding how the criminalization of survivors came to be and the manner in which we must respond to this issue. Further, understanding the intersection with race and gender based issues is critical to having a thorough, comprehensive understanding of the issue. Understanding the criminalization of survivors (how and why it happens) is key to being able to address the issue. Another goal of this workshop is to give advocates, attorneys, law enforcement officers, and other professionals concrete tools that can be employed in the context of their respective roles to prevent survivors from being criminalized to begin with, helping criminalized survivors navigate the legal system, and advocating for the release of incarcerated survivors. Various professionals can offer support and intervention at various points in the trajectory or experience of a criminalized survivor. This workshop aims to explain offer tools that professionals can employ in their day-to-day and also offer brief information about efforts dedicated specifically to serving criminalized survivors for those with interest in launching projects in their particular communities.

June 25 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Kelly Miller & Layla Bagwell
Bilingual Social Change Associate &
Social Change College Intern @ Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence

Intergenerational Partnerships to End Gender Violence

Presentation Outline:

Young people have been at the forefront of each social movement and revolution. The Idaho Coalition has invested in a strategy that cultivates intergenerational partnerships that center the experiences of youth from historically marginalized communities (Black/brown/Indigenous, Youth with Disabilities, Queer & Trans youth, and Youth who are immigrants and have been resettled through the refugee process) in their strategy to end gender violence, specifically teen dating violence. The intergenerational partnerships are integrated into the Idaho Coalition’s primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategy based on the wisdom of our movement elders, Indigenous knowledge (shared with us), and futurism. The Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence has received the OVW Rural Technical Assistance grant from the Department of Justice’s Office of Violence Against Women to develop materials for youth who have experienced teen dating violence like sexual assault, rape, abusive relationships, and develop a campaign for February’s National Teen Dating Violence Awareness & Prevention Month; and provide technical assistance in the prevention and response to Teen Dating Violence for OVW Rural grantees.

Learning Objectives:

1. Participants in this session will be able to successfully:

2. Identify and abide by Idaho’s Mandated Reporting Laws and maintain client privacy.

3. Develop a strategy in primary prevention to engage youth in shifting culture that creates conditions for gender violence to exist in rural communities.

4. Engage in peer conversations with rural preventionists and responders about how to center the lived experiences of youth who are most impacted by gender and systemic violence.

5. Identify additional resources statewide and nationally to support emerging established youth programming.

June 25 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Emily Bernath
Owner @ Emily Bernath LLC

Empowering Survivors to Use their Voice: Changing the narrative on sexual assault going unreported

Presentation Outline:

The cycle of justice for a survivor of sexual assault cannot start until what happened to them gets reported. The reality in our society is that sexual assault is the most underreported violent crime, and most perpetrators will never see prison time. According to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, only 31% of sexual assaults are reported to the police and only 2.5% of perpetrators will be incarcerated. Survivors aren’t neglecting to report their sexual assaults and bring justice that is deserved to perpetrators because they don’t think it’s important. The reality is that many survivors don’t have positive experiences when bringing up their abuse, and our world has not given itself a reputation of believing survivors. When survivors are talking about their abuse, they’re exhibiting great vulnerability and reliving an extremely painful experience. If we give them the impression that we don’t believe them, all it does it create more pain for them. This presentation will look at reporting from the survivor’s perspective and address how to create safe spaces, build trust, and break down the commonly reported barriers that stop survivors from reporting their abuse.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn to better view the experience of reporting sexual assault from the victim’s/survivor’s perspective.

2. Gain tools for addressing the trust barriers that survivors give for not reporting their sexual assault to the police.

3. Learn to create an environment for survivors that is a safe space for them to report what happened to them and be believed.

June 26 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Sherri Cameron
Detective @ Boise Police Department

Stalking – Investigative Tactics & Case Review

Presentation Outline:

This presentation will consist of a Stalking case review. The female victim was married. She fled the marriage and the state (Oregon) and took asylum with her parents in Boise. The course of conduct covered months and included vandalism, burglary, and arson. The suspect used multiple methods to harass his estranged wife. Use of victim services are critical for stalking victims and the case review will include services rendered. The initial behaviors were reported in Oregon and then Idaho. The review will discuss the necessity of using a dynamic stalking investigation approach. The discussion will include things learned during the investigation, and tips for future success.

Learning Objectives:

1. Attendees will walk away with a fresh approach and set of skills for stalking investigations.

2. Attendees will understand the importance a dynamic stalking investigation, and take away tips to succeed.

3. At the end of the session, the attendee will be able to identify victim resources for stalking investigations.

June 26 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Donna Bartos, MPA
Founder @ BLOOM365

L.E.V.E.L.S. with Gen Z
Youth Interpersonal Violence Response Training

Presentation Outline

Teen victims of Interpersonal Violence (IPV) are reluctant to seek help. According to the Urban Institute (2018), only 10% IPV youth victims reach out to informal, formal, or professional sources of help (teachers, counselors, case workers, police). Most teen victims do not seek help due to the barriers of stigma, wanting to maintain privacy, lack of knowledge about resources, and not recognizing violent acts as worthy of intervention. National Institute of Justice studies further indicate that these help seeking barriers are even more significant for underserved youth, which includes teen boys, LGBTQ+ youth, youth with disabilities and youth who have limited English proficiency. Although students who have experienced IPV victimization have contact with a range of “trusted adults” throughout the course of a school day, 80% say they would rely on a friend or a peer rather than professional support services (BLOOM365 Survey, 2012-2019). This LEVEL™ response strategy is based on the notion that those closest to the problem have the clearest solution and that youth are safer when they are connected to supportive peers, adults and communities. How a peer or “trusted adult” responds to youth experiences with victimization can have a profound effect on their safety, healing and their willingness to reach out for help.

 This LEVEL™ response training centers the lived experiences of youth victims beyond the walls of traditional adult-centered services. and aims to provide new advocates with a memorable and simple tool to help alleviate the help seeking barriers faced by teen victims. During this highly interactive workshop, participants will utilize the trauma-informed L.E.V.E.L.™ advocacy tool developed specifically to provide culturally inclusive and non-judgmental support to teen victims of interpersonal violence. Participants will leave with new skills, tools and the confidence to LEVEL: Listen, Empathize, Validate, Encourage, Link to Resources.

Learning Objectives

L.E.V.E.L.™ with Gen Z: Removing Barriers to Seeking & Receiving Help: Listen, Empathize, Validate, Encourage, Link to Resources

Do you feel fully prepared to respond to and support teens who are going through or who have experienced victimization? If not, this L.E.V.E.L.™ response training was created just for you. Listening skills or lack thereof, implicit bias, and “adultism” can create roadblocks to good advocacy for teens. This workshop will provide you with the tools to provide teen victims and survivors with empathetic, validating, encouraging and relevant support. During this highly interactive workshop, you will utilize the practical L.E.V.E.L.™ advocacy tool developed specifically to provide culturally inclusive and non-judgmental support to teens. A L.E.V.E.L.™ conversation with a teen going through victimization could make all the difference by preventing feelings of isolation, shame and fear. You don’t have to be an expert to L.E.V.E.L.™ and provide help. It’s all about non-judgmental support, absent of advice giving, judgment and opinion.

1. Identify the unique lived experiences of Gen Z youth who witness, experience or use violence

2. Learn about the L.E.V.E.L.™ disclosure response protocol (listening, empathizing, validating, encouraging, and linking to resources)

3. Understand the nuance of language when responding to teen victimization

I. Introductions
Donna Bartos, MPA (BLOOM365)
Attendees

II. L.E.V.E.L.™ Training Overview
– Objectives
– Define L.E.V.E.L.™

III. Barriers to Help Seeking & Receiving

IV. Listen
– Active Listening
– Reflective Listening
– Empathetic Listening

V. Empathize
– Non-Judgmental Response
– Got Empathy

VI. Validate
– Ending Victim Blaming
– Empowerment-Based Responses

VII. Encourage
– Self-Advocacy
– Safety, Healing & Well-Being

VIII. Link to Resources

IV. Toolkit: practicing how to L.E.V.E.L.™ (on own)

June 26 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Anne Wardle, RN
Supervising Nurse @ Ada County Community SAFE Team

Medical Forensic Exams and the Ada County Community SAFE Team

Presentation Outline:

– Introducing the Ada County Community SAFE team to participants.

– How our team developed and what the parameters are for obtaining a sexual assault or domestic violence exam in Ada County.

– Describing how our process includes law enforcement and victim witness coordinators.

– Why we don’t call our patients victims.

– What our medical interview includes, and what our sexual assault medical forensic exam and/or domestic violence medical forensic exam includes.

– How our team connects patients with the Ada County Victim Center resources.

– How to obtain medical records.

– Testifying in court

Learning Objectives:

1. How to activate a SANE.

2. Who is eligible for a sexual assault exam or a domestic violence exam.

3. How the medical history/interview is conducted and what the exam includes.

4. What the exam can and cannot do.

5. How to obtain the medical record notes of our exam.

June 25 @ 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Shawn Hill
Director of Proba6on Services for Bingham County

Navigating the Probation System – Probation Simulation

Simulation Outline

The whole purpose of the Probation Simulation is to help criminal justice and related professionals understand what people experience when they are released from jail/prison and re-enter society or placed on Probation. The Probation Simulation allows participants an opportunity to “Walk a mile in their shoes” and gain a better perspective of the challenges these individuals face daily. Having this understanding helps all criminal justice and related professionals be more professional and conscientious in their day-to-day work and a little more compassionate.

Learning Objectives

1. Participants will gain a better understanding of the challenges individuals face when re-joining society after incarceration or being placed on probation.

2. Participants will be able to identify roadblocks in and around their own professional roles, which may lead to effective or creative problem-solving.

June 25 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Amber Moe
Senior Program Manager, Center for Justice Innovation

Shelley Carson
5th District Family Court Services Manager

Honorable Kira Dale
Ada County Magistrate Judge

 

Comings & Goings Simulation (PART 1)

Simulation Outline & Learning Objectives

This interactive* exercise will focus on barriers to safety for victims of domestic violence and will enhance participants’ understanding of the multi-faceted considerations that accompany a victim’s decision to remain in or return to an abusive relationship. “Comings and Goings” was originally created by the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life. This version was adapted from the National Judicial Institute on Domestic Violence workshop, Enhancing Judicial Skills in Domestic Violence Cases.

**Disclaimer- this session is highly interactive and simulates an abusive relationship. Participants will be moving around the room and asked to play a role in an abusive relationship. Participants are encouraged to take care of themselves, keeping in mind their current and past experiences, and determine if this exercise is suitable for them.

June 25 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Amber Moe
Senior Program Manager, Center for Justice Innovation

Shelley Carson
5th District Family Court Services Manager

Honorable Kira Dale
Ada County Magistrate Judge

 

Comings & Goings Simulation (PART 2)

Simulation Outline & Learning Objectives

This interactive* exercise will focus on barriers to safety for victims of domestic violence and will enhance participants’ understanding of the multi-faceted considerations that accompany a victim’s decision to remain in or return to an abusive relationship. “Comings and Goings” was originally created by the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life. This version was adapted from the National Judicial Institute on Domestic Violence workshop, Enhancing Judicial Skills in Domestic Violence Cases.

**Disclaimer- this session is highly interactive and simulates an abusive relationship. Participants will be moving around the room and asked to play a role in an abusive relationship. Participants are encouraged to take care of themselves, keeping in mind their current and past experiences, and determine if this exercise is suitable for them.

June 26 @ 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Shawn Hill
Director of Proba6on Services for Bingham County

Navigating the Probation System – Probation Simulation

Simulation Outline

The whole purpose of the Probation Simulation is to help criminal justice and related professionals understand what people experience when they are released from jail/prison and re-enter society or placed on Probation. The Probation Simulation allows participants an opportunity to “Walk a mile in their shoes” and gain a better perspective of the challenges these individuals face daily. Having this understanding helps all criminal justice and related professionals be more professional and conscientious in their day-to-day work and a little more compassionate.

Learning Objectives

1. Participants will gain a better understanding of the challenges individuals face when re-joining society after incarceration or being placed on probation.

2. Participants will be able to identify roadblocks in and around their own professional roles, which may lead to effective or creative problem-solving.

June 26 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Amber Moe
Senior Program Manager, Center for Justice Innovation

Shelley Carson
5th District Family Court Services Manager

Honorable Kira Dale
Ada County Magistrate Judge

 

Comings & Goings Simulation (PART 1)

Simulation Outline & Learning Objectives

This interactive* exercise will focus on barriers to safety for victims of domestic violence and will enhance participants’ understanding of the multi-faceted considerations that accompany a victim’s decision to remain in or return to an abusive relationship. “Comings and Goings” was originally created by the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life. This version was adapted from the National Judicial Institute on Domestic Violence workshop, Enhancing Judicial Skills in Domestic Violence Cases.

**Disclaimer- this session is highly interactive and simulates an abusive relationship. Participants will be moving around the room and asked to play a role in an abusive relationship. Participants are encouraged to take care of themselves, keeping in mind their current and past experiences, and determine if this exercise is suitable for them.

June 26 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Amber Moe
Senior Program Manager, Center for Justice Innovation

Shelley Carson
5th District Family Court Services Manager

Honorable Kira Dale
Ada County Magistrate Judge

 

Comings & Goings Simulation (PART 2)

Simulation Outline & Learning Objectives

This interactive* exercise will focus on barriers to safety for victims of domestic violence and will enhance participants’ understanding of the multi-faceted considerations that accompany a victim’s decision to remain in or return to an abusive relationship. “Comings and Goings” was originally created by the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life. This version was adapted from the National Judicial Institute on Domestic Violence workshop, Enhancing Judicial Skills in Domestic Violence Cases.

**Disclaimer- this session is highly interactive and simulates an abusive relationship. Participants will be moving around the room and asked to play a role in an abusive relationship. Participants are encouraged to take care of themselves, keeping in mind their current and past experiences, and determine if this exercise is suitable for them.

June 25 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Katie Francis
Owner & Trainer @ The Hill Education & Consulting

Making Sense of Your Worth for Victims of Domestic Violence

Presentation Outline

Making Sense of Youth Worth is a curriculum that was created by The Halo Project in Oklahoma City. This  curriculum has a specific designation to support victims/survivors of Domestic Violence that is often overlooked as a resource. The content within the series is focused on self-worth and creating secure attachments. Throughout the program the attendees are able to identify and process “their lies” and create a new pathway for themselves. This structure support program allows individuals to process their own history in a way to create change. This program can be offered as an alternative to a mental health provider/clinical visit, where we know there is little to no access for many of our communities. This program is also one that can be offered virtually to access our more rural and remote regions. Providing a program that can truly impact the lives of those affected by violent crimes is my goal in sharing about this resource.

Learning Objectives

1. The goal of the session would be to introduce attendees to the program and what the key learnings are that can happen. It could serve as a springboard for those interested in offering it within their facility or practice and also as something they could attend as an individual. They will walk away with a fundamental understanding and identify a tool that can be used in their daily practice with victims of violent crimes.

June 25 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Lori Jump
CEO @ StrongHearts Native Helpline

Introduction To StrongHearts Native Helpline “Taking A Native Centered Approach to Domestic and Sexual Violence

Presentation Outline:

Established in 2017, StrongHearts Native Helpline is culturally appropriate for Native Americans and Alaska Natives impacted by domestic and sexual violence. Advocate training is steeped in Native American culture and tradition. It is with real-time data in Indian Country that may find a path toward justice and healing.

– A Native Centered Approach To Advocacy
– Native Centered, Empowerment Based, Trauma Informed
– Who We Serve | Referral Services
– Advocate Training
– Culture Makes A Profound Difference
– Historical Trauma, Invisibility & Complex Jurisdictional Issues
– Seven Years of Evolution: Real-Time-Data
– Demographics
– Abuse Types
– Service Barriers
– Shelters & Service Providers
– The Impact
– Statistics in Indian Country
– Missing and Murdered Indigenous Relatives (MMIR)
– A Path Toward Justice
– VAWA (1994, 2000, 2005, 2013, 2022)
– TLOA (2010)
– ICWA
– How To Help

As the only nationwide domestic and sexual violence helpline that is culturally appropriate for Native Americans and Alaska Natives, the past seven years of data help to clear a path toward justice and healing. StrongHearts Native Helpline was designed by and for Native Americans and Alaska Natives and 100 percent of StrongHearts advocates are Native American. We regularly provide virtual webinars and inperson presentations as well as attend community gatherings to disseminate information and education as well as promotional items.

Learning Objectives:

1. An Introduction to StrongHearts Native Helpline will educate participants about the importance of culturally appropriate support and advocacy for Native Americans and Alaska Natives.

2. As a national helpline culturally specific for Native Americans and Alaska Natives, StrongHearts advocates collect real-time data that will help to define areas of need and resource disparities.

3. Uplift victim survivor issues impacted by antiquated laws and jurisdictional loopholes that contribute to domestic and sexual violence against Native Americans and Alaska Natives.

June 25 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Jennifer Magelky-Seiler, Will Wallace & Dana Gover
Advocates @ Idaho SUN Collaborative a partnership with Idaho Coalition Against Violence and Sexual Assault (Jennifer & Will); ADA Training & Technical Assistance Consultant @ The Northwest ADA Center-Idaho (Dana)

Presuming Competence: Tips For Working With Disabled Survivors & How To Support Them

Presentation Outline:

• Who we are.
• What is the Idaho SUN Collaborative
• Victimization of people with disabilities
• Common misconceptions about people with disabilities
• The importance of presuming competence
• Use respectful language when talking about disability.
• Use respectful language when talking about disability.
• How to effectively communicate with people with disabilities
• How to interact with family and support
• How to provide basic accommodations/ create a welcoming environment.
• Where to go for more information and resources to support disabled survivors.

Learning Objectives:

1. Be able to learn from individuals with lived experience how to serve and support people with disabilities better.

2. Gain insights into common misconceptions about disabilities, the importance of presuming competence, tips for using respectful language, and effective communication strategies for working with disabled people.

3. Understand how to provide basic accommodations and create a welcoming environment and where to seek additional information to meet the needs of disabled survivors.

June 26 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Lisa Mason
Director of Executive and Legislative Affairs @ Idaho Secretary of State

Idaho Address Confidentiality

Presentation Outline:

An introduction to the Idaho Address Confidentiality Program (ACP) and how it could be a tool to assist with safety planning for survivors of domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, malicious harassment, or human trafficking. When victims move to a new location to escape abuse, ACP can help keep their new address confidential. This is done through the use of a mail-forwarding service and substitute address. All state and local government agencies are required to accept the substitute address as the actual address of the individual.

Learning Objectives:

1. The different ways that the ACP program can help survivors interact with state and local government agencies without revealing their addresses.

2. What qualifications are required for a survivor to be able to participate in the Address Confidentiality Program and how they can refer someone to the program.

June 26 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Tomiko Tamashiro Pardo
Healing Across Languages Senior Project Coordinator @ Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence

Addressing the Connection Between Trauma and Language Access for Victims/Survivors of Gender-Based Violence

Presentation Outline:

Addressing the connection between trauma and language access is crucial for victims of crime as it plays a significant role in their recovery and access to justice. Trauma can impact how victims process and communicate their experiences, making it essential to provide them with language access support to share their stories and access necessary services effectively. By understanding the intersection of trauma and language access, professionals can better support victims of crime in navigating the legal system, seeking help, and rebuilding their lives. This holistic approach ensures that victims receive the care and support they need to heal and seek justice in a trauma-informed and linguistically sensitive manner.

I. Introduction
A. Welcome and Introductions
B. Setting the Context: Trauma and Language Access in Gender-Based Violence
C. Overview of Presentation Structure and Objectives

II. Trauma-Informed vs. Trauma-Responsive Approaches
A. Differentiating Between Trauma-Informed and Trauma-Responsive Practices
B. Understanding the Benefits of Trauma-Responsive Approaches
C. Importance of Tailoring Responses to Survivors’ Trauma Experiences

III. Language in the Experience of Trauma
A. Impact of Language on Trauma Perception and Processing
B. Communication Challenges Faced by Trauma Survivors
C. Exploring Cultural and Linguistic Factors in Trauma Experiences
D. Exploring Cultural and Linguistic Factors in Trauma Experiences

IV. Language in the Narration of Trauma
A. Role of Language in Expressing Trauma Narratives
B. Challenges in Verbalizing Traumatic Experiences
C. Supporting Survivors in Sharing Their Trauma Stories

V. Language Access as a Necessary Trauma-Informed Component
A. Defining Language Access and Its Relevance in Trauma Recovery
B. Ensuring Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Service Provision
C. Strategies for Integrating Language Access into Trauma-Informed Care

VI. Organizational Response to Trauma and Language Access
A. Importance of Organizational Commitment to Trauma-Informed Practices
B. Creating a Culture of Safety and Respect for Trauma Survivors
C. Implementing Policies and Procedures to Address Language Access Needs

VII. Case Studies and Best Practices
A. Highlighting Successful Approaches to Addressing Trauma and Language Access
B. Sharing Real-Life Examples of Effective Interventions
C. Lessons Learned and Recommendations for Professionals

VIII. Collaborative Efforts Among Advocates, Criminal Justice Professionals, and Social Service Providers
A. Recognizing the Interdisciplinary Nature of Supporting Survivors
B. Promoting Collaboration for Comprehensive Trauma Care
C. Strengthening Networks and Partnerships for Enhanced Services

IX. Q&A Session and Discussion
A. Engaging Participants in Interactive Dialogue
B. Addressing Key Questions and Concerns
C. Encouraging Reflection and Knowledge Sharing

X. Conclusion and Call to Action
A. Summary of Key Insights and Takeaways
B. Urging Continued Advocacy for Trauma-Informed Language Access
C. Empowering Participants to Make a Difference in Supporting Survivors

Learning Objectives:

1. Identify how exposure to trauma impacts a victim/survivor of a crime’s ability to communicate.

2. Identify how language access is a necessary trauma-informed victim advocacy approach.

3. Identify organizational strategies to enhance access to LEP survivors/victims of crime.

June 26 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Sofia Cervantes, MSW
Advocate

Breaking Barriers: Advancing Abuse Reporting Through Innovative Communication Tools for Individuals with IDD and Beyond

Presentation Outline:

1. Introduction
– Overview of victimization among individuals with disabilities (BSU & ICDD Report, Spring 2022)
– Discussion of existing barriers to abuse reporting and the need for innovative trauma-informed solutions, especially for those who are non-verbal or have limited communication skills
– Emphasize the importance of building trust and rapport through recognizing competence and maintaining high expectations

2. Understanding Communication in IDD Communities
– Address the importance of viewing behavior as a form of communication
– Discuss common forms of nonverbal communication, including gestures, initiations, repetitions, scripts, borrowed language from media, etc.
– Highlight the significance of discerning intention behind communication cues and exploring themes and underlying meaning

3. Innovative Tools and Interventions
– Review the importance of using tools to empower individuals with IDD to express themselves and discuss abuse/trauma
– Introduce and demonstrate alternative interviewing techniques, such as comic strip conversations
– Describe the “Language Ladder” by Dr. Barry Prizant and how it can be applied to address trauma and abuse reporting
– Discuss the controversy surrounding Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AC) and the use of “naive” facilitators to increase validity
– Integration of innovative techniques into standard abuse reporting protocols and procedures

4. Teaching Safety and Importance of Reporting
– Overview of key safety concepts like “5 Is Against the Law” and “Social Circles” to educate IDD community about recognizing and reporting unwanted behavior
– Describe preference scales as a measure to empower individuals to choose desired social interactions and prevent abuse
– Stress the significance of continuously creating safe and open spaces to explore and report early signs of abuse

5. Conclusion
– Summarize the importance of rapport-building and ongoing communication for preventing abuse within IDD communities
– Highlight the importance of the use of victim-centered care tools and approaches to empower individuals to overcome barriers to abuse reporting
– Emphasize the importance of continued innovation and collaboration in advancing abuse reporting efforts for individuals with IDD and beyond

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the prevalence of abuse among individuals with IDD and learn innovative trauma-informed solutions to address barriers in reporting

2. Increase awareness of a variety of communication tools and methods available to facilitate conversation to improve abuse reporting, particularly for individuals who may have challenges with verbal communication or are hesitant about discussing their abuse/trauma

3. Develop insight into the significance of behaviors, scripts, and repetitive language as forms of communication among individuals with IDD, recognizing their potential implications, including indicators of abuse

4. Apply victim-centered care approaches and communication methods tailored for individuals with IDD who are nonverbal to enhance abuse reporting within the IDD community

5. Integrate innovative communication tools and approaches into standard abuse reporting protocols and procedures, potentially creating new promising practices for service enhancement

June 25 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Nicholas Edwards
Commander @ Idaho Internet Crimes Against Children Taskforce

Internet Crimes Against Children Taskforce – What We Do, How We Can Support Your Cases, and Case Study Examples Studies.

June 25 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Jennifer Zielinski

Human Trafficking

Presentation & Learning Objectives

1. Understand the complex nature and post-trauma effects of human trafficking, and how safe coordination of care builds effective responses.
2. Identify the intersection of polyvictimization and human trafficking.
3. Become familiar with trauma-informed, survivor-centered approaches.
4. Understand how trauma impacts individuals affected by human trafficking.
June 25 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Sherri Cameron
Detective, Boise Police Department

Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault – Case Review

Presentation Outline

This presentation will consist of a case review. The investigation from beginning through the court proceedings will be included. The victim was both physically and sexually assaulted by her husband. The span of abuse was over a 10 year period. During the investigation, it was discovered that both children had also been victims of physical violence at the hands of their father. The importance of including victim services to included forensic interviews, DV and Sexual Assault Exams, obtaining a Protection Order, counseling, and inclusion of a civil attorney will be discussed. Helpful investigative tips and things learned will be included.

Learning Objectives

1. Attendees will walk away with a fresh approach and a list of skills to assist with domestic violence/sexual assault investigations.

2. At the end of the session, the attendee will be able to identify victim resources to utilize during investigations.

3. Attendees will understand the importance of applying a full family approach to cases.

June 26 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Shannon Salazar & Bailey Skillings
Detective & Victim Witness Supervisor @ Ada County Sheriff’s Office

Interview Techniques

Presentation Outline:

– Our focus will be on FETI using that for an interview skills and how it’s useful with victims of trauma.

– Understanding the trauma and how it has impacted victims. Having the skill set to use FETI and obtain information from the victim. How to deal with recanting and issues that also come up with victims of domestic battery. Important to restore the Power and Control back to victim in order for them to help process the trauma they experience and can lead to better cooperation from the victim.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn about FETI.

2. Understanding how FETI works with trauma victims.

3. Understanding the dynamics of domestic violence.

4. Learning about cooperation and recanting with victims.

June 26 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Aleshea Boals 
Victim Witness Coordinator @ Idaho Attorney General

Scott Bandy, JD
Deputy Prosecutor @ Ada County

Victim Witness Coordinator 101 & Restitution

Presentation Outline

We have recently recreated a comprehensive Victim Witness Coordinator manual for Idaho Victim Witness Coordinators. We recognize that Idaho Prosecutors have a variety of office and staff sizes. It is our hope that we can coordinate consistent victim services throughout Idaho. Victim Witness Coordinators are carefully placed throughout the Idaho judicial landscape. Many larger communities employ a victim witness coordinator within law enforcement agencies to assist during investigations and crisis response incidents. Prosecutors’ offices most frequently employ victim witness coordinators to assist victims once the case has been charged, prepare victims and witnesses for trial and sentencing. Prosecutor Victim Witness Coordinators also assist victims with victim impact statements and pre-sentence investigations. When a case has been adjudicated and the defendant is sentenced to confinement, the Victim Witness Coordinator at the Idaho Department of Correction assists victims if there are issues while the defendant is in custody. When the offender is eligible for parole, the Victim Witness Coordinator at the Idaho Commission of Pardons and Parole assists victims with notifications on parole hearings and accompanies the victim during such hearings. If a defendant files an appeal following their conviction, the victim witness coordinator at the Idaho Office of Attorney General will contact the victim, explain court proceedings, and notify victims of opinions. The Victim Witness Coordinator at the Office of the Attorney General also assists with conflict investigations and conflict prosecutions. Idaho Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) operate under the Idaho Office of the Attorney General. The task force uses the Office of the Attorney General Victim Witness Coordinator on ICAC cases. The Idaho Victim Witness Association (IVWA) promotes professional standards and procedures, provides training and support for members to facilitate effective assistance for crime victims throughout the State of Idaho. Victims in Idaho deserve the best services we can offer. It is our hope that this manual along with training for office staff will create unified victim services throughout the State of Idaho.

Learning Objectives

The attendees will be provided with the Victim Witness Coordinator handbook that has recently been created. They will have checklists of information for each type of crime along with the appropriate resources that should be provided to all victims. Attendees will learn how victim’s cases flow through the criminal justice system and connect with other Victim Witness Coordinators and Statewide programs.

June 26 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Joshua Hurwit, JD
U.S. Attorney @ U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Idaho/DOJ

Ensuring Justice for Federal Crime Victims at the United States Attorney’s Office

Presentation Overview:

The U.S. Attorney for the District of Idaho will explain the federal protections afforded to victims of crimes and will review how dedicated Department of Justice employees serve victims throughout the lifecycle of a federal case, including by working with community partners.

Learning Objectives:

1.  Attendees will come away with a better understanding of the Department of Justice’s practices in serving victims and protecting their rights.

2. The presentation also seeks to strengthen partnerships with stakeholders to provide justice for victims.

June 25 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Neurobiology of Trauma (1)

June 25 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Neurobiology of Trauma (2)

June 25 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Neurobiology of Trauma (3)

June 26 @ 10:30 - 11:45 am

Neurobiology of Trauma (4)

June 26 @ 1:15 - 2:30 pm

Neurobiology of Trauma (5)

June 26 @ 2:45 - 4:00 pm

Neurobiology of Trauma (6)

Professional Development

Continuing education credits will be available from the Idaho State Bar, POST, and National Association of Social Workers. 

ACCOMMODATION

We have reserved a block of rooms at the Riverside Hotel:

  • Monday, June 24 = 135 rooms
  • Tuesday, June 25 = 135 rooms
  • Wednesday, June 26 = 30 rooms

Room rates are quoted exclusive of local taxes and fees, currently 13%.
RESERVATIONS: Reservations will be made by INDIVIDUAL CALL-IN no later than THURSDAY, MAY 15, 2024.
After that date, Riverside will accept reservations based on availability and at the prevailing rate.

To reserve your room, please call 208-343-1871 and ask for the Awareness to Action: Transforming Responsive Services in Idaho Conference” group rate. 

If you are reserving a room, please read this!

Dilemma: The Riverside does not offer block rooms at the GSA rate during summer months as their demand is too high.  They have set $199/night for our block of rooms.  The Federal Government will not reimburse lodging if the invoice states over $165/night. It will not even pay $165/night, and agencies pay the $34/night.

Solution: BHT has worked with Riverside Hotel to “buy down” the rate, meaning BHT will pay $34/night for each night within our block of rooms, so your invoice only says $165/night. That way, for example, ICDVVA grantees can submit this for reimbursement as part of their grant awards; and similar with other agencies using federal funding to attend the conference.

IMPORTANT: Your invoice should say $165/night and not mention the $34/night paid by BHT.  If it does not reflect this, please contact faye@buildinghopetoday.org so we can work through any hiccups together.    

This BHT offer to “buy down” your room rate will only last until May 15, and there are only a limited number in our block, so book rooms early!

Learn more about us

Click HERE for ICDVVA’s website.

Click HERE for IDCARTF’s website.

Click HERE for BHT’s one-pager.

Planning Committee (alphabetical)
  • Darci Anderson – Idaho Crime Victim Compensation Program
  • Micaela Ríos Anguiano – Idaho Coalition Against Domestic & Sexual Violence 
  • Amy Duque – Idaho Council on Domestic Violence & Victim Assistance
  • Jean Fisher, JD – Building Hope Today
  • Sonja Howerton – Idaho Network of Children’s Advocacy Centers
  • Rachel Kaschmitter – Idaho Council on Domestic Violence & Victim Assistance
  • Amber Moe – Idaho Council on Domestic Violence & Victim Assistance
  • Mindy Peper – Idaho Governor’s Children At Risk Taskforce
  • Jill RobertsonIdaho Governor’s Children At Risk Taskforce
  • Michael Rotchford – Building Hope Today
  • Sheila Sturgeon Freitas, Ph.DIdaho Governor’s Children At Risk Taskforce
  • Jennifer Tachell – Idaho Governor’s Children At Risk Taskforce
  • Tammara Tarvin – Idaho Sheriff’s Association
  • Faye White – Building Hope Today
  • Dana WiemillerIdaho Council on Domestic Violence & Victim Assistance
Questions?
We’d love to see you there!

Register Today

PLEASE COMPLETE THE FORM BELOW TO REGISTER.  *SPACE IS LIMITED TO THE FIRST 500 PEOPLE TO REGISTER*

WHAT NOW?

THANK YOU

WE WILL BE IN TOUCH!

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